Colosseum

Hi everyone! For today’s post I wanted to talk about the Colosseum. The Colosseum was commissioned in the year 72 by the Emperor Vespasian, and it was completed in 80 by his son, Titus. Later, it was modified and improved by a man named Domitian around the years 81 to 96. It was originally named the Flavian Amphitheatre, but was changed later on. In its prime, the Colosseum was an amphitheater and it could hold up more than 50,000 people.

The structure was originally 50 meters high and 156 meters wide, and it was constructed mainly with concrete. The structure is divided into four layers; three of the layers present different types of column styles. The bottom has doric, the second layer has ionic, and the third layer has corinthian. The architect cleverly shows off the progression in style of columns, this being doric, ionic, and corinthian.

Just like we have theaters today that we go to for entertainment, the Roman empire had their entertainment with the Colosseum (but way more intense)! The Colosseum was mainly used for gladiatorial combat, which involved brutal matches between gladiators and animals. These animals were housed in underground tunnels that were under the main platform, where the battle took place. The Colosseum also had events called mock sea battles, where it would be filled with water, and people would reenact battles.

I do have to say that this is probably one of the greatest architectural structures I have ever seen. It was insanely massive and very well put together, especially since it’s almost been up for 2,000 years, and a majority of it is still standing. And there are some people out there who may think that the ancients weren’t as advanced or sophisticated as we are now, but they really were; they may not have been as technologically advanced as we are today, but they know knew a lot; this structure proves that they were advanced for their time.

 

 

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